BBC, recently, plays a film called “Blame It on Fidel”. In the film, the little boy asks his elder sister “how long is ten minutes”, she answers “I don’t know. It depends on situation.” When little boy feels bored, he stares at clock and says “this ten minutes is so long.” Most people have this sort of experiences like this little boy. We can define how long is too long for us, however, Read More

I regularly pass through the Quartermile development on route to George Square library, My eye is often drawn to the numerous marketing displays around the site promoting the idea of living and working within the development. Two things occur to me, firstly the use of the human image in the “artists impression” of the site , to give scale and warmth to the drawing, to add a touch of humanism to what are quite brutal buildings, perhaps. Secondly I am impressed by the degree of realism imparted to some of the cad images, the completed structures really do match these images. But? Read More

China’s censorship of its media is always a controversial topic. The authorities in China are always trying to balance the people’s need for more information with their goal of maintaining power. The Communist Party’s Central Propaganda Department, which is the most powerful monitoring body, gives the media strict directions to guide them away from politically sensitive topics and promote party principles. What is more, some websites deemed potentially dangerous by the government , such as Facebook, Twitter, Flicker, the BBC’s Chinese Website, the New York Time’s Website are blocked within China. Read More

Amazing 3D is like pop science book for 3D fans. It reveals the evolution of 3D image in the history with some rare posters and images behind the scene. This book was printed in 1982, long before the phenomenon of 3D now. I also got the feeling that the 3D films are especially fanatic in Asia. The film, 3D image and audio all came from western, when the 3D stereoscopy was popular in Western countries and millions of stereoscopy images were sold, Asia people missed it. The first tide of 3D images came in the late 20th Century to Asia along with the prosperity of digital technology. Some of the TV manufacturers have started producing the 3D television even though there is not yet any 3D broadcasting channel. The 3D feature is also embedded into the camera.

I attended the seminar by the lead of researchers from Disney Edinburgh research today. In one of the videos he showed, the sensors on the chair will detect the players action and vibrate to simulate the game environment which is the common 4th dimension added to the 3D films. I noticed that at in the slides he prepared, one of the future research area will be the viewers’ comfort when viewing 3D films. Both the 3D glass and the too intensive 3D view depth would cause uncomfortable to the audience.

 

 

 

Reference: Amazing 3-D by Hal Morgan and Dan Symmes

Mr Blandings builds his dream house  is a film about the architectural process, light-hearted with a strong comic element, but at it’s core, a salutary lesson on how small changes impact on a project.

Likewise with digital translations of the original celluloid print, small variations have profound effects. The movie above started as a copy of the monochrome film, but in encoding the film small changes to the format change the movie beyond all recognition to this stream of highly coloured artefacts. Read More

Humour brings lots of fun in our daily life and is helpful for interpersonal communication, especially in social occasions. People use various ways to show their humour and irony is the common one. Irony can be shown in written or verbal context, normally, they are implicit and contrast to the meaning of utterances themselves or the context. Read More